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J:sonSystem: How it works

When making wings, it’s possible to fuse a patterned wing material with a neutral one. This way, an air pocket is created between the two layers, increasing the fly’s floating ability. 

Regardless of whether your fly is used on the water surface, in the surface film or sub surface, the wings and wing buds will be very realistic in shape, color and structure. At the same time, they are extremely durable. 

The raw material for wings and wing buds consists of guaranteed toxic-free foil, and produces no harmful gas of any kind when burned. It’s approved by Swedish health authorities for use in the food industry. All J:son tools and materials are made in Sweden. 

How to make wings

Trim excess material around the printed pattern (leave 1-2 mm for burning). Place in the appropriate wing burner and burn/weld the edges quickly with an open flame. You now have a perfectly shaped, realistic wing. The body of foam, the light weight and water surface tension all mean the fly will float like a dream. 

Use double wing material when tying larger flies. This creates an air pocket inside the wing, enhancing floating capabilities. 

Use a printed wing material and marry it with a neutral one. Trim excess material (leaving 1-2 mm for burning) around the printed pattern, place in the appropriate wing burner and burn/weld the edges quickly with an open flame. 

You now have a perfectly shaped, realistic wing that contains air, which – together with the body of floating foam – makes the fly virtually unsinkable. 

How to make wing buds

When burning wing buds on smaller nymphs, use only one layer of printed wing material (you can color it if you want) so that the nymph won’t be too thick.

Cut away the excess material around the printed pattern (leaving 1-2 mm to burn). Place into the appropriate wing burner and burn/weld the edges quickly over an open flame. You now have a perfectly shaped insect head with a realistic back and faithfully rendered wing buds. The nymph’s floating abilities are determined by the hook and weights. 

You’ll want to use double wing materials when making a larger nymph, so that you create a stronger and more durable head, back and wing buds. Use printed wing material along with one of the neutral ones.

Cut away the excess material (leave 1-2 mm for burning) around the printed pattern, place in the appropriate wing burner and burn/weld the edges quickly over an open flame. Squeeze any remaining air out from the prepared wing buds.

You now have a perfectly shaped insect head with a realistic back and faithfully rendered wing buds. The nymph’s floating abilities are determined by the hook and weights. 

How to make bodies

Cut a strip of foam in any size and color. Clip your thread in the spring at the back of the body pin, and secure your thread with a couple of tight turns around the tip of the pin. 

If you want, use 2-3 synthetic fibers as tails. Hold them in your tweezers, adjust the length and cut them about 2 mm in front of your tweezers. 

Take a lighter and burn them together, creating a small bead – this prevents the tails from coming loose after you have tied them in. Hold the tails with the bead backwards parallel to the body pin. 

Tie in the tails with a couple of turns and pull them until the bead is just behind the tip, then secure with 3-4 tight turns. 

Fold the foam strip in half under the tip and pull it back upwards, parallel with the pin. Tie in as close to the tip as possible with 3-4 turns and release your grip on the foam. 

Then wind your thread between the foam strips backwards one or two turns around the pin separately. 

Stretch the foam backwards again, make 2-3 turns around both foam and pin for a first segment. Release the foam, 1-2 turns backwards on the pin, stretch the foam backwards and make a second segment. 

Repeat the process until you are satisfied with the length of the body, then tie off. 

Use the TyinGuides to get the right proportions. 

 
Copyright J:sonSweden AB. Sven Källfeltsgata 18, 426 71 Västra Frölunda. Sweden.